Monday, October 08, 2007

Tip # 8...Visit one of the many museums devoted to history

Ok, so the Cardinals win and my beloved Packers lose. Such is fate. My money should have been on the Cardinals.



But, enough regrets over yesterday. Our Family History celebration tip for today is simple, sweet and satisfying. And, like the other tips, can be tailored to your timetable. It is a marvelous springboard to discuss your family history during each era. The fireside chat exhibit in the attached photo inspires discussion, where were your parents, grandparents on Dec. 7, 1941?


There are so many incredible museums available to us. The displays and artistry attract young and old to interact and discuss each exhibit. It's a marvelous way to see history come alive.

Museums permeate large and small cities and villages. The Arizona Historical Society has four museums across the state. Locations include Flagstaff, Yuma, Tucson and Tempe. For detailed information, visit their web site at http://arizonahistoricalsociety.org/.




When my family visited the Tempe location last week, we enjoyed all exhibits and were impressed to find a special exhibit commemorating the Wallace and Ladmo show.




Here is just a small sampling of Arizona museums and their corresponding Web sites.
· Pioneer Living History Museum, http://pioneer-arizona.com/
· Casa Grande Valley Historical Society & Museum,
http://cgvhs.org/
· Jerome Historical Museum,
http://jeromehistoricalsociety.org/
· Mesa Historical Museum,
http://mesaaz.org/
· Apache County Historical Museum
http://wmonline.com/attract/apmuseum.htm
· Wickenburg
Desert Caballeros Western Museum, http://westernmuseum.org/
· Gilbert Historical Museum,
http://www.gilbertmuseum.com/

I am certain you can uncover many more in Arizona or anywhere you may live. This list could go on and on, however, I could never cover all of the wonderful museums I have experienced. A brief list follows of some of my favorite museums across the country. Test drive one yourself. No matter which museum you choose, memories and family history will become a part of it.


Wisconsin Favorites
Milwaukee Public Museum, http://www.mpm.edu/
Green Bay Packer Football Museum and Hall of Fame, (especially helpful after a loss to the Bears) http://www.lambeaufield.com/hall_of_fame/visit_the_hall_of_fame/

Tennessee Favorites
Carnton Plantation,
http://www.carnton.org/

4 comments:

Frank said...

I apologize for the Pack losing. It was the first game I watched completely through this season. I cursed them since I was rooting for them. I love museums. The Arizona Historical Society's museums have always been amongst my favorites. Your question o'the day is a good one. With 9/11 being so much in the news it is easy to forget the impact of 12/7/41. The American experience truly changed that day. You inspired me to read my grandfather's letters to his family from his WWI prison camp. In one he asked for them to stop sending vegetables and to send two dozen oranges instead since that was what everyone was craving, fresh fruit.

Anna said...

Your grandfather's letters are a treasure. I can hardly imagine sending vegetables to a prison camp, but obviously with the war in Europe, where else could they put them. Did you know that there was a German POW camp near the Papago Park are? Also have you organized his letters in archival safe binders?

Frank said...

It's funny you should mention the binders. I am very disorganized in my storage and I was just telling myself that I should place all the family papers in protective binders. I have papers from the early 1800s stacked in folders. Not a good plan. I didn't know about the POW camp here. Very interesting. (an unintentional Arte Johnson imitation)

Anna said...

Actually there is a bit of information on the POW camp. Here are a couple of links which I read a few months ago.

http://home.arcor.de/kriegsgefangene/usa/camps_usa/papago_park.html

http://www.epcc.edu/nwlibrary/borderlands/12_one_german_pow's_story.htm

http://www.epcc.edu/nwlibrary/borderlands/12_one_german_pow's_story.htm

The details of the POW camps are rarely mentioned when the media discusses WWII. These stories share a very difficult perspective